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Smith's top end presentation pieces like the Brighton Pavilion were generally built to order by the customer. Unlike the company's smaller skeleton clock models, these clocks were so expensive to produce, at nearly one year's wages for the average worker in the 1860's, that the company would not have had an extensive pre-built inventory. Since these were often purchased as special gifts like weddings, anniverseries or retirement of execuatives the base would contain an inscription codifying the event. One could have an 'entry level model' that would not have the cocks or bridges fretted out, but only left in the 'solid'. Springs with plainer tails. No silver appliques, plainer dial hands, simpler hammer springs held by screws without decorative washers, plain pendulum rod and bob. (First four photos). One photo shows a wood base which may be a replacement. The last photo shows the Brighton clock with optional urns in the upper corners. The various strike levers are also in a bit of a different configuration than on my and other examples. This clock is nearly as elaborate as the example I have (has the urns, but missing upper bell silver applique and pull repeat mechanism).

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